Mike Heiligenstein Describes Solutions To Austin’s Traffic Problem

Mike Heiligenstein presently serves as the executive director of the Central Texas Mobility Authority. Mr. Heiligenstein has served in government for over three decades. His previous positions include being a council member at the city of Round Rock, Texas.

Mike Heiligenstein was later elected and served as county commissioner of Williamson County. In these positions Mike helped to develop and acquire parkland including the scenic Brushy Creek Regional Trail. He also helped complete many local transportation projects.

Mr. Heiligenstein attended the University of Texas. He completed both an undergraduate degree and a master’s degree in government. Additionally, Mike holds a masters in business administration from the University of Texas. Besides serving as the executive director at the Central Texas Mobility Authority, he also serves as a board member of the Texas Transportation Institute as well as the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association.

Recently, Mike Heiligenstein wrote an opinion article that was published in the Austin-American Statesman online publication. In his article Mr. Heiligenstein was responding to a previous article published by another person in the Statesman about how traffic would increase in the Austin, Texas area and how tech driven solutions were badly needed. Learn more about Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority: http://ctxmobilitymatters.com/about-mike-heiligenstein/

The following is a brief synopsis of what Mike had to say about Central Texas’ traffic problems and the solutions that are taken to address it by him and the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority.

An article on Biz Journals revealed that one of the solutions that Mike Heiligenstein and the CTRMA have implemented to help ease traffic congestion in Central Texas is the building of more roads and the expansion of existing ones.

Examples of new roads that have been recently constructed includes 183A that goes through the communities of Cedar Park and Leander and the US 290 toll road that spans from Austin to the town of Manor.

Another way that Mike Heiligenstein says the CTRMA is working to make roads less congested is by partnering with tech firms such as Metropia and Carma. Metropia, which is a mobile application, provides commuters with real time alternative routes to take should there be major traffic jams in the roads they usually take.

Carma is another mobile application that lets commuters find other commuters who are headed towards the same or close destination by car. Using Carma, commuters can then carpool. It is estimated that there are almost 900,000 empty seats on a typical Austin commute during the workday. If carpooling increased, traffic congestion would decrease dramatically.